Cara Mitchell

September 2, 2008

“What Public Relations is Not…” and Ch. 13: PR and Marketing

Filed under: Reading Notes — by caramitchell @ 3:12 am
Tags: ,
  • PR, advertising, and marketing are all related, but have different focal points. While marketing focuses on everything involved with selling products to consumers, public relations focuses on numerous publics – not just consumers. Advertising is centered on the use of controlled media to reach and impact its public.
  • Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is a type of marketing that focuses on the consumer and the individual versus mass marketing.
  • The beliefs about what PR is, and is not are still up in the air and the majority of scholars and practitioners hold varying views on the subject. After reading our textbook which includes the vocabulary word “marketing public relations” and the blog post “What PR is Not…” – the two do not agree with one another which is a reflection of the way things are in the field today.
  • The fact that some believe a solid line should be drawn between PR and marketing and others feel that it is fine and useful to mesh the two together or consider one a part of the other reflects the section in our book from Ch. 1 (p. 9). One of the four barriers of PR practitioners that is noted is the difference in the ways that various managers and fellow practitioners view public relations. This is why it is important to understand what PR is and is not for yourself since there are so many different opinions…This chapter and blog post were definitely two must-reads because it’s definitely necessary to understand the differences between all of these different, yet related fields.
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4 Comments »

  1. I recently wrote about this subject from an editors point of view (http://billbennettnz.wordpress.com/2008/08/19/how-to-get-noticed-a-publicity-primer/). One of the things that disturbs me, as an editor, is that many people in business don’t understand the difference between advertising, editorial and public relations.

    Comment by billbennettnz — September 2, 2008 @ 3:58 am |Reply

  2. Insightful notes, Cara. The last one especially shows me you thought about things and picked up on some important nuances in the readings. So happy to have you in class again this semester!

    Comment by prprofmv — September 3, 2008 @ 1:12 pm |Reply

  3. Thanks Dr. V! I’m super glad to be in your class again too! 🙂

    Comment by caramitchell — September 3, 2008 @ 5:41 pm |Reply

  4. Hi, Cara. I know this comment comes really, really late, but I spent most of September goofing off and avoiding the digital world. You are correct when you say that PR professionals have “varying views on this subject,” but I think most will agree that PR and marketing MUST mesh when the objective is to introduce, promote and sell products and services. Marcom is part of what PR people do, and it’s critical when integrated communication is called for.

    That said, not all PR activities are marketing related. What about employee communication, government relations, community relations? These are functions far removed from marketing, yet vital to an organization’s success.

    The disagreements over where PR “belongs” tend to reflect one’s own perspective. That is, you define it from where you sit. But if a marketer tells you PR is a subset of marketing, you’ve met a marketer who knows little about our field. Sounds as though Dr. V is making sure your discussion is a broader one. Bravo, and long live critical thinking!

    Comment by Bill Sledzik — September 26, 2008 @ 3:51 pm |Reply


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